She returns.

Until today, I hadn’t had a period since mid-June 2008. That’s a long time. And it’s been rockin awesome. I’ve never been a big fan of the ol’ monthly, not since my first one (April 1, folks… no joke) in the 6th grade. The past week or so I’ve had some pain around my c-section scar and some morning nausea. I actually took two pregnancy tests within a week, because I was a wee bit worried I was pregnant and didn’t know it (SO not ready to be pregnant again). But, Sadie has been nursing less and less–I guess this is the whole baby-led weaning bit working in its own way–so it’s really not surprising that I’m seeing a return of my cycle.

There are a couple of things I want to do differently now that I’m on this side of having a baby. First, (those of you with squeamish sensitivities, skip ahead to the next paragraph) the thought of a tampon makes me want to die. I have no idea what the problem is, but when I contemplated it this morning I thought, I would rather die than put one of those in. Okay, then. So I got a Diva Cup today. Not the easiest thing so far–there’s definitely a learning curve, but so far it’s alright. At least my new revulsion has turned me on to something more eco-friendly. Bonus.

Second, I know I don’t want to go back on the pill. It makes me a-crazy. And it’s not free. But I don’t want to get knocked up accidentally, either. I’ve got some sort of app on my iPhone (figures, doesn’t it?) that might help me add up the days of my “mentalstreation.” I’ve heard about Taking Charge of Your Fertility, and I learned ALL ABOUT natural family planning in my senior year Religion Class. Does anybody else have other suggestions (other than prophylactics)?

17 thoughts on “She returns.

  1. Naomi

    Found your blog through offbeat mama.

    The birth control option I use is a 12 weekly injection called Depo Provera (in Australia). If you use it for long enough you never have periods any more (other than rare spotting). After you come off of it, apparently within another 12 weeks your body should be back to its normal cycle. Anyway, I haven’t noticed any problems with it so far, and its fairly low maintenance. Also the injection is tiny, they only inject like 1ml into your muscle, so its over in a flash.

    Another option is an implant. But I haven’t tried it, and I’m pretty sure you might still get your monthly period on it.

    Reply
    1. Brooke Post author

      @Naomi I’m glad you found my blog, and thanks for commenting! I’ve had some friends on Depo with mixed reviews. I’m not so crazy about the potential adverse effects, though. Although I’m not jazzed about my period being back, I think skipping the hormones is a bigger priority for me than eliminating my period. My mom had the implant for a while. I’m not sure how she liked it.

      Reply
  2. Bex

    I’m in the same place as you right now, though I’ve come to terms with tampons again. As for birth control, it’s been an issue for me forever. I hate hormonal stuff. HATE it. It makes me crazy and practically asexual. We used natural planning before getting pregnant with Jack, and had to deal with constant criticism from everyone about the “rhythm method.” But it’s so much more than that, and I truly believe that if you have a regular period, and are consistent and vigilant, it works. Of course, I got pregnant by surprise. And as much as my friends tease me about my stupidity, the truth is I got pregnant because I got lax. It worked so well for so long that we started being less careful, started shaving off days in the “no-go” period, and that was our mistake. If we hadn’t, I am convinced it would have remained a reliable form of birth control for us.

    That being said, I won’t be using it again. I would just be too paranoid, and have no desire to face the teasing if something should happen. I’m considering the copper, non-hormonal IUD, but haven’t made a decision yet. Good luck with yours!

    Reply
    1. Brooke Post author

      @Bex Yes, it’s the getting lazy part that has me concerned with NFP, etc. Though I do like a calendar! I’ve thought about an IUD, but apparently you’re not supposed to use the Diva Cup with an IUD. Sheesh!

      Reply
  3. eve

    I had something very similar to the Diva Cup while I was in college, but I can’t remember what it was called. I never really got the hang of using it and ended up switching back. Hope you like it. No tips on the birth control issue, either. sorry!

    Reply
    1. Brooke Post author

      @eve I’ve heard of the Keeper. I really just picked the Diva Cup because it was the only thing carried at our Whole Foods. I was so glad they carried at least one option–I’d figured I was going to have to order something online, and I really wanted something that day. So far, so good, though!

      Reply
  4. Sam

    I LOVED Taking Charge of Your Fertility. MIke and I used that method of “fertility awareness” (she doesn’t call it NFP) for a long while and will continue to use it now that I am post baby. Once you get the hang of it and in the habit (and those iphone apps are great! if i had an iphone I’d use it!) it’s no problem at all. Any questions about it just let me know!!!

    Reply
    1. Brooke Post author

      @Sam Do you know which particular iPhone apps are supposed to be good? Do you know anybody using one that they like?

      Reply
  5. Connie

    Hey, I’ve been trying to use the Diva cup for awhile, but I can’t get the hang of it. If you are successful, let me know.
    I hate the idea of putting hormones in my body or keeping to any real schedule so we stick to the old school approach: condoms.

    Reply
    1. Brooke Post author

      @ Connie So far the Diva Cup is going pretty well. The, um, installation can be a little tricky, but I think I’ve already got it down pretty well. It’s definitely not something I’d want to do in the bathroom at work, but since I only have to change it every eight to 12 hours, it’s been no problem to do it at home. As for condoms, we both really don’t like them, so we’re pretty prone to “forgetting” to use them. And they’re 100 percent ineffective if they’re still in the drawer! I do think we’ll keep them handy, for if the mood strikes during a “no no” point in my fertility (of which I hopefully will be aware).

      Reply
  6. Syd

    I use the diva cup, or did before I got pregnant. I love it, warning, wear a liner just in case it doesn’t suction correctly. I used fertility planning as birth control for about 2 years before I got pregnant. I use http://monthlyinfo.com/ to track my info and at first I used ovulation pee sticks to see when I was ovulating. Eventually, I just knew when I could get pregnant and we’d use alternate means of satisfaction 🙂 or condoms during that time.

    Reply
    1. Brooke Post author

      @Syd Thanks for the link! And that’s a great idea, using the ovulation sticks to get the hang of things. I was actually pretty successful–obviously–at figuring out when TO have sex in order to get pregnant. So it really shouldn’t be too terribly different figuring out when NOT TO in order to stay unpregnant. In theory… 🙂

      Reply
  7. Shannon

    You know the issues I had with periods and birth control I have had after having Nash. I know you said you don’t want to do birth control but right now I am liking the one I am on. It’s Seasonique and you only have a period once every three months. So, that’s better and I am not having the pain and stuff I was with my old birth control

    Reply
    1. Brooke Post author

      @Shannon Thanks for the tip. The “death cramps” would be one reason I would consider going back on the pill. Because I can’t even imagine taking care of Sadie on a day when those cramps hit. So far, I’ve just had that bit of pain under my scar and the nausea. But we’ll see how the next couple of periods go.

      Reply

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